WikiLeaks.org taken down by US DNS provider

WikiLeaks has been taken down again. Around 04:00 GMT this morning (Friday), DNS lookups on the wikileaks.org domain stopped working, effectively cutting the domain off from the whole internet. Neither cablegate.wikileaks.org nor www.wikileaks.org can currently be resolved to an IP address.

WikiLeaks later tweeted that the domain was "killed" by US company EveryDNS.net. This was a potential weakness that Netcraft identified back in October, when WikiLeaks temporarily stopped using US-based web servers to host the Iraq War Logs content.

Earlier this week, Joe Lieberman of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs had encouraged other companies to terminate their relationship with WikiLeaks. It is unclear whether this influenced EveryDNS.net's decision, as they claim it was due to the DDoS attacks against the domain. A statement from EveryDNS.net said, "The termination of services was effected pursuant to, and in accordance with, the EveryDNS.net Acceptable Use Policy." EveryDNS.net claims to have provided sufficient warning to WikiLeaks, noting that, "Any downtime of the wikileaks.org website has resulted from its failure to use another hosted DNS service provider."

The committee issued another press release yesterday, announcing their intention to go after WikiLeaks by amending the Espionage Act. Lierberman accuses "Julian Assange and his cronies" of hindering their war efforts and creating a hit list for enemies.

WikiLeaks could get their sites up and running again by using different DNS servers, such as the French ones used for the Iraq War Logs in October. However, the wikileaks.org domain is still registered with a US company, Dynadot LLC, which could be 'persuaded' by the government to prevent such modifications, or even suspend the domain.